THE POWER TO INSPIRE: Advanced III

Motivate innovation, change and talent

An unskilled approach to motivating people can quash creative ideas, create resistance, and lead to mediocre outcomes.

In this fast-changing marketplace, inspiration is paramount. First, your teams and leaders must collaborate, generate ideas quickly, and produce competitive results. Next, you need to leverage the diverse strength of your people to drive change. Finally, better mentor promising talent with skillful coaching tools to transform beliefs and clear the runway for success.

Poorly directed innovation, change and development often triggers resistance. Don’t let change happen. Inspire it.

Develop peak performance communication in three core areas:

CULTIVATING INNOVATION: Diversify thought to drive ideas
  • Generate ideas quickly and make fast decisions
  • Transform conflict into collaboration
  • Translate diverse ideas into practical results
LEADING CHANGE: Leverage the strength of your people
  • Identify key stakeholders and determine how best to involve them
  • Minimize resistance and harvest the best thinking of your people
  • Build resilience within your teams in the midst of ambiguity
COACHING FOR RESULTS: Mentor the rise of future leaders
  • Learn practical tools for motivation, inquiry, and feedback
  • Transform limiting beliefs to develop new behaviors
  • Design and execute a strategic career roadmap

LEARNING DESIGN


FOR

• A team that must generate new ideas quickly
• A leadership team planning change organization-wide
• A leader invested in developing rising talent

METHOD

• Delivered live in an interactive, desk-free setting
• Frequent small-group breakouts for practice and feedback
• Powerful tools to manage mindset in relevant scenarios

“When leaders ensure that frontline staff members feel a sense of ownership, the results show a 70 percent success rate for transformations. When frontline employees take the initiative to drive change, transformations have a 71 percent success rate. When both principles are used, the success rate rises to 79 percent.”

— Scott Keller, Mary Meaney and Caroline Pung

McKinsey & Company